Unbreakable Hostage by L.E. Harvey

cover of the book Unbreakable HostageUnbreakable Hostage by L.E. Harvey
Genre: Mystery
Published: 2010
No. of Pages: 222
Series:
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ISBN: 9781935407065
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A gripping suspense novel, it is the story of Lareina Oliveira: a Ph. D. student at UCLA, studying algebra. She has a seemingly ordinary life. Lareina works as a teacher in addition to her Ph. D. studies. She has wonderfully close relationships with her family and her roommate, Sandy. Her life is a rather quiet one, but Lareina is very happy with things as they are. School life seems normal, though one of her classmates, Tony Covelli, is captivated by Lareina and pursues her throughout the semester. Repeatedly, Lareina turns Tony down and focuses more on her private life. Refusing to take no for an answer, Tony eventually kidnaps her and keeps her as his prisoner in a cabin well hidden in the woods. Lareina is held hostage for over two weeks. The only thing keeping her alive is her determination and resourcefulness. Lareina uses her wits and knowledge of algebra to send Sandy and her family text messages in order to help them to find her. Sandy; Lareina’s family; her professor from UCLA, and a lonely but dedicated Missing Persons policeman named Marcus Raymer work night and day to try to save Lareina. She is held hostage, and raped and tortured for days on end. Will they be able to get to her before it’s too late?

Written on the Body by Jeanette Winterson

cover of the book Written on the BodyWritten on the Body by Jeanette Winterson
Genre: Fiction
Published: 1992
No. of Pages: 190
Series:
No. In Series:
ISBN: 9780394223049
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Written on The Body is a tender dissection of erotic love. The prose is like a poem, lush with wit and imagery, but behind the luxuriant relish of the words, there is a scalpel-sharp cut of emotions. Love and longing are the wounds through which Winterson’s imagery flows. The novel begins with regret: ‘Why is the measure of love loss? It hasn’t rained in three months … The grapes have withered on the vine.’ The narrator is also suffering from a heart-stricken drought. She is grieving for the loss of her true love, Louise. Louise has flowing Pre-Raphaelite hair, and a body besieged by leukaemia, her cells waging war: ‘here they come, hurtling through the bloodstream trying to pick a fight.’ But Louise is not dead, merely abandoned by the narrator with the best of intentions. As the lament continues, striking in its beauty and dazzling inventiveness, more of the love story is revealed. The narrator has been a female Lothario, falling in love, and out again, swaggering like Mercutio. But then she meets Louise, married to Elgin–‘very eminent, very dull, very rich’–and is hopelessly, helplessly smitten: ‘I didn’t only want Louise’s flesh, I wanted her bones, her blood, her tissues, the sinews that bound her together.’ Elgin persuades her to leave for the good of Louise’s health, and all is undone. Winterson does not shy away from grief, or joy. She has acutely described how love can transform a life, but also destroy it too. But, for Winterson, where there is love there is hope: ‘I stretch out my hand and reach the corners of the world … I don’t know if this is a happy ending but here we are let loose in open fields.’ Eithne Farry

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